Dragonfly Sconces – Body Construction Done

After I hung the cabinet I made for the guest room I was eager to get on to building a pair of the Dragonfly sconces I designed (plans are available for downloading here).  As a quick recap, this is inspired by a Dard Hunter stylized dragonfly design that was used in a tile and other items.  I came across this and thought it might make a cool stained glass design — I was “shopping” for ideas for the glass panel for the Byrdcliffe-ish cabinet.

Anyway, this is the design I came up with.  It’s relatively simple, although given how slow I seem to be at completing projects I wasn’t sure how long it would take.  I deeded to keep track of my hours to get a better feel for this.  When I used to build chopper parts and had to do the same thing over and over I kept track of how long everything took me so I could plan my time.  It got to be something of a race and I eventually got really fast at each operation.

CAD rendering for the Dragonfly sconce

CAD rendering for the Dragonfly sconce

To get started on building the sconce I printed out the plans I made, full size on 11×17 paper at Kinkos.  (Hint: if you do this Adobe Acrobat will try to “scale to fit” the plans, make sure you print them at 100%).  I cut out the full scale layout for the shade, wall mount and corbel so I could make some patterns.

Full scale layout for the main parts

Full scale layout for the main parts

I used some spray adhesive to glue the patterns to some .060″ thick aluminum sheet.  I guess thin MDF or even thick poster board would work too.  I trimmed the aluminum to the layout lines and I had my templates.  I used the pattern for the shade to set up the pattern board for the stained glass shades.  I made sure it was exactly symmetrical.  As long as each assembled panel fits into the pattern board they should end up even when I solder four of the together.  I set this aside for now, hopefully I’ll be able to get to the glasswork next weekend.

Pattern board for the glass shades

Pattern board for the glass shades

I machined all of my stock (more Quartersawn White Oak) to thickness and rough dimensions.  Then I used the patterns for the wall plate and corbel to lay out the details.

Outline lay out for the wall plate

Outline lay out for the wall plate

Corbels laid out

Corbels laid out

Patterns

Patterns

It took me perhaps 30 minutes to make the patterns, and another 30 minutes to dimension the oak and to the layout.  Then I lost track of time and got completely caught up in building…

I wanted to get everything done to the wall bracket I possibly could before I cut the profile shape on the ends.  I did the through mortises for the support arm and the square holes for the 5/16 ebony plugs first.

Mortises done

Mortises done

Then I routed recesses in the back for the keyhole hangers, drilled the wire hole and routed a clearance slot in the back for wires.

Fitting the keyhole hangers

Fitting the keyhole hangers

I made the tenons on the horizontal brackets next.  I used my tablesaw with a dado blade to cut the outside shoulders – leaving me with one wide tenon the correct height and as wide as the outer edges of the mortises.  Then I knifed in the inside walls of the tenons, transferring them from the mortises and used my tenon say to cut the inside fact and chopped out the waste.  I got a decent fit after some fine tuning with a chisel.

Mortises fit

Mortises fit

Test fitting the brackets

Test fitting the brackets

Once I was satisfied with the mortise and tenon joint I routed a wire groove in the support arm, transferred the location to the wall bracket and drilled a through hole and was finally ready to cut out the profile on the wall plates.  I sawed as close to the line as I could, then cleaned up the shape with rasps and sandpaper.  Before I knew it I was gluing up the brackets and it was only 2:30 in the afternoon.

Gluing up

Gluing up

I took a break, ate lunch, fixed a clogged drain and went back out to the shop.  Making the corbels and the cover plate for the wire groove was simple stuff.  I drilled and tapped the hole in the cover plate to 3/8-27 to match the size of the 1/8 IPS threaded tube used in lamp parts.  I glued and pin nailed these parts in place and suddenly I was done with both sconce bodies.  Wow, that went pretty quick. I have to make the ebony plugs and put some finish on these, but it’s mostly making the shades now.

Completed sconce brackets

Completed sconce bodies

Back of the sconce body - the tenon ends need to be flushed up after the glue is fully dry

Back of the sconce body – the tenon ends need to be flushed up after the glue is fully dry

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Byrdcliffe-ish Cabinet Finished

Like everything lately, this project seemed to take me FOR-EVER!  But it’s done now, and I think it came out great.  It’s square, solid and straight.  The proportions work, the finish is a great color and has a nice warm glow, and the stained glass panel work nicely in the door.

It’s completely different in character than the Byrdcliffe cabinet, definitely squarely in the Mission vernacular.  I installed it in the guest room, perhaps a skosh too high in retrospect.  The room sorely needs a repaint, but my next project is to make a pair of sconces for the room which will entail punching holes in the drywall to re-wire it, so that can wait.

I’m off to clean up the shop so I can unpack my new tool which should be delivered by 3:00 this afternoon.  And start in on the sconces.

Finished cabinet outside, catchin' some rays

Finished cabinet outside, catchin’ some rays

Details on the door

Details on the door

French cleat screwed to the wall -- I was able to hit three studs, two 3.5" deck screws in each stud.

French cleat screwed to the wall — I was able to hit three studs, two 3.5″ deck screws in each stud.

Installed!

Installed!

The paper print outs show where the sconces will go

The paper print outs show where the sconces will go

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So close I can taste it…

I’m not talking about BBQ this time.  I am that close to finishing the cabinet I’ve been working on.  I was sure I could finish it yesterday and get it installer.  After all, all I had left to do was rub out and wax the finish and do the final assembly.

I rubbed all of the parts out with 0000 steel wool, then top coated with dark brown wax.  I like the end result a lot, and it wasn’t that much work.  I went through the process in an earlier post, but to recap: I started with a slightly diluted “Brown Mahogany” Trans-Tint dye which I let dry throughly and then rubbed with a red scuff pad.  I top coated with “Candlelite” gel stain, a coat of linseed oil, one coat of Garnet shellac and one coat of Blond shellac.  And Dark Brown wax.

Rubbing out the finish with steel wool, then waxing

Rubbing out the finish with steel wool, then waxing

Back slats finished

Back slats finished

Then it was time to assemble everything.  The back slate screwed into the cabinet, adding the french cleat to the back, installing the glass in the door, and hinging the door.  Let’s start with installing the back.  I’d pre-cut and fit all of the parts before finishing, so this should be pretty straightforward.  I fit in the first piece and used my drill/countersink combo tool to drill the pilot holes for the first screw.  SNAP!  Wait, don’t tell me… The drill bit broke off.

Broken drill bit when installing the first back slat

Broken drill bit when installing the first back slat

No big deal, I grabbed some vise grips and slowly worked it back out.  Then I drove to the hardware store, got a new drill bit, installed it in the countersink tool and got the back all installed.  Check!

Next I made a french cleat from 1/2″ plywood and installed it.  Check!

Next up, installing the glass in the door.  I’d already pre-cut the filler strips to hold the glass in the rabbet, so it was a simple matter of driving in some brads to hold everything together.  Check!

Now, just the hinges for the door.  I’d already had the door installed.  The hinge mortises we done, the door had been installed (using steel screws), this should be simple.  I waxed my first brass screw and started to put it in.  Well before it seated in the hinge the head split at the screwdriver slot.  Wow.

Split screw

Split screw

Luckily I was able to grab the broken screw with a tiny pair of pliers and back it out.  I don’t know if it’s a manufacturing defect, or if perhaps the patins slightly weakened the brass (I doubt it) or perhaps…I don’t know.  But I’m off to the hardware store today to get a dozen new screws to assemble this.  So close, it will be hung on the wall and filled with books by this afternoon – I have a new project to start and a new tool being delivered so I need to get crackin’.

 

 

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Fueling up the hand tool woodworker

So, a guy’s gotta eat, right?

With the advent of Spring I decided to make pork ribs for dinner yesterday.  Having grown up in Missouri I have a natural tendency toward good BBQ.  Although, “grown up” might be a stretch.  Let’s just agree that I lived the first 30 years of my life there and not digress into discussions of my maturity, ok?  OK.

Ribs need to be a balance of textures and flavors.  You don’t really want “falling off the bone”, that’s limp and mushy.  But you definitely want meat that pulls off the bone cleanly and easily.  I like a balance of smokey meat flavor and a sweet, tangy crust.  Here is what I did:

First, start with some quality pork ribs, either baby back or loin ribs trimmed St. Louis style.  Have the butcher pull off the membrane from the bone side, rinse them with cold water and pat them dry.  Then I puncture the meat between the bones with a fork from both sides and rub in some lemon juice.  Cover liberally with your favorite dry rub and wrap in plastic; leave then to marinate like this for a few hours.

I usually make my own rub, but most of the store bought ones are pretty good.  It’s usually a base of salt, pepper, paprika and brown sugar with other spices like cumin, celery seed, chili powder, “smoked” paprika, dry mustard and maybe finely ground coffee.  It’s fun to play with.

Ribs prepared, rub with lemon juice and coated with dry rub

Ribs prepared, rub with lemon juice and coated with dry rub

I prepared the ribs at about 6am and left them in the fridge while I went to work in the morning.  Since I had to work from home in the afternoon (my son is on spring break this week) I was home to start cooking them by 1:00.  I fired up with smoker with hickory pellets (in truth they are 1/3 hickory and 2/3 oak), put the ribs on and closed the lid.  Every hour or so I opened the lid and basted the ribs with  either apple juice or beer — I used both this time.  The smoker runs at 190-200 degrees.  I love this thing, I cook dinner on it almost every night year-round (not always at 190 smokey degrees, it will crank up to about 450 for grilling)

Smoking...

Smoking…

About two or three hours in I decided to start on the baked beans.  I use three kinds of beans, and I drain the white and pinto beans.  I keep the “sauce” from the canned baked beans.  Mix the beans with 1/2 cup of brown sugar (packed) and 1/3 cup of molasses and sorghum syrup.  Add in a table spoon each of dry rub, dry mustard and BBQ sauce, and a small can of Tomato paste.  Mix in half a bottle of your favorite beer.

Making smoked beans

Making smoked beans

Meanwhile brown about 1/3 pound of bacon in a skillet, then add it 1/2 diced onion and some fresh garlic.  Saute until the onion and well cooked.  The pan will have some crust on the bottom from the bacon, deglaze the pan with a 1/4 cup of white vinegar and turn the entire mixture into the pot with the rest of the bean mixture.

Saute onion and garlic with browned bacon

Saute onion and garlic with browned bacon

Stir and put on the smoker with the ribs.  When you do your hourly spritz with beer or apple juice give the beans a stir too.

Beans and Ribs on the smoker

Beans and Ribs on the smoker

After the ribs have been smoking for about four hours it’s time to wrap them.  I mix together 1/3 cup of the following: butter, honey, packed brown sugar and apple juice.  Warm it in the microwave to melt the butter.

Ingredients for the rib wrap

Ingredients for the rib wrap

Pull the ribs off, put them on a double layer of aluminum foil and pour half of this mixture over each rack.  Close the foil tightly and put back on the smoker for another hour or so.

Wrap the ribs with the butter/honey/brown sugar/apple juice mixture

Wrap the ribs with the butter/honey/brown sugar/apple juice mixture

Keep the temp at around 190 degrees, after an hour pop open one of the foil packs to check, you should see about 1/2″ of bone protruding from the edges of the rack.  If not you could give it another 15 to 20 minutes wrapped, but be careful.  Too much time in the foil will lead to limp, soggy ribs.

Once you’re ready to unwrap the ribs be sure to catch the liquid from the foil pack in a small saucepan.  This will be a mix of the apple juice/butter/honey/brown sugar mix plus meat drippings and some of the rub from the outside of the ribs that washed off.  Put the ribs back on the smoker for another hour at least.  While the ribs continue to smoke bring the saucepan with the catchings from the foil pack inside.  Add a couple of tablespoons of your favorite BBQ sauce and simmer to reduce the mixture until it’s about the consistency of cream.  I put a coat of the sauce on both sides of the ribs and smoke for a final hour

Making the glaze for the ribs

Making the glaze for the ribs, catchings plus some BBQ sauce

Finally, the ribs are done.  In total I had these on the smoker for 7 hours, they were ready at 6 hours but I had an 8pm work meeting I had to dial in to so I just left them in the smoke until that was done.  I have to say, these are the best ribs I’ve made to date.  Great flavor and perfect texture.  The outside had a nice sweet and tangy flavor, the meat was tender and smoky.  The beans are great too.  I made enough for a small army I think, my son asked me if we were having company.

Next up: finishing and installing the Byrdcliffe-inspired cabinet.

Finished ribs

Finished ribs

Smoked beans

Smoked beans

 

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Stained Glass Panel for Cabinet Finished

I got some time in the shop yesterday and was able to finish the stained glass panel for the Byrdcliffe-inspired-but-Mission-styled cabinet I’m making.

I spent probably an hour fine tuning the fit of the pieces on the grinder, and ended up re-making one or two more pieces.  I think it was time well spent because the finished panel cam out pretty nice I think.  The process of assembling the panel goes like this:  First the pieces need to be cleaned to remove any “Sharpie” layout lines or numbers and any residue from grinding.  Then I put them on a hot plate (set on “low”)  that is covered with a few layers of paper to warm up.  This makes sure the parts are dry, but more importantly it makes the copper foil easier to apply.  I used 7/32 foil for this, which seems to be a decent size for me.  You can go a little narrower, but if you’re off a tiny bit in applying it then you end up with places where you don’t have foil on both sides of the glass.

Starting to apply the copper foil

Starting to apply the copper foil

Panel completely foiled and ready for soldering

Panel completely foiled and ready for soldering

Once the parts are all foiled I’m ready to solder the seams.  I keep it in the frame I made at least until I’ve tacked all the parts together to hold the alignment.  I use a special solid 60/40 solder that is made for stained glass work, and apply flus with a brush.  It’s pretty simple work, although the technique is different than soldering electrical connections.  In this case you apply the solder to the iron as you move the iron along the seam, and the goal is to apply enough so that you have a decorative bead.  If the joint is fluxed and the copper foil is properly adhered the solder will flow easily.

I usually end up soldering the front, focusing on getting a good connection and an adequate amount of solder in place but not being overly concerned about the evenness of the beads.  Then I flip it over and solder the back side trying to get really nice beads.  The solder from the front will have pulled through already, but it won’t be complete, full beads.  Finally I go back to the face side and re-run all of the seams, flowing in more solder as necessary to get even rounded beads.  There are other techniques for the solder beads, and in fact there are books on “decorative soldering” where you can create textures or patterns in the solder.  On the “Inglenook Sconce” I used a sponge on the molten solder to make an organic texture.

For this panel, before I did the final smoothing of the seams I added the zinc boarder.  I wanted to get the border on first so the thickness of the seams at the edges didn’t interfere with the fit of the channel.

Soldered panel and zinc frame

Soldered panel and zinc frame

Once the panel was soldered I washed it with “flux remover” and soap and water to make sure all the flux was off.  then I applied a chemical patina to darken the solder and washed it again.  Finally it gets a coat of “glass polish” which appears to be about the same as thinned liquid car wax.

Finished Panel!

Finished Panel!

There are a few minor mistakes with the panel, but overall I’m happy with it.  I checked the fit, and it is perfect for the door in the cabinet.  If I can get some shop time in tonight I can probably finish the cabinet and hang it.

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Stained Glass Panel

I got a couple of hours in the shop yesterday, and finished cutting the glass for the stained glass panel for the Byrdcliffe-inspired cabinet.  Like everything this seems to be moving in slow motion, but I’m continuing to chip away at it.

The process to make the panel is pretty simple.  Cut and fit all of the pieces, clean them and wrap the edges with copper foil tape, solder and apply patina.  There are plenty of details to sort through along the way.  Getting an accurate cut required some hand skills with the glass cutter when to score the shape.  Tight curves and long thin pieces are separate challenges.  You can offset lack of skill with the cutter by spending more time at the grinder, but that slows things down.

If I can read the pattern through the glass I may cut it directly, but most often I need to outline the pattern with a sharpie to be able to see it though the glass, and then I draw it directly on the glass.

Marking pieces to cut

Marking pieces to cut

Then I score the cuts, plus any relief cuts I need and break the pieces apart.

Pieces scored and broken apart

Pieces scored and broken apart

Then I hit the pieces on the glass grinder to tune up the shape and fit, and drop them onto my master pattern board.  As I go I inevitably decide to fine tune other pieces or even re-make them because the color is off or the fit isn’t acceptable.

Fitting in more pieces.  I'm going to re-make #39, 2 and 3 because I'm not happy with the fit.

Fitting in more pieces. I’m going to re-make #39, 2 and 3 because I’m not happy with the fit.

Eventually I got all the pieces made with the help of my son Kolya.  He’s a pretty deft hand at stained glass when I can pull him away from video games and South Park re-runs.  And Golf, although I don’t mind that and in fact spend a chunk of my weekends ferrying him bcd and forth to the golf course.

All the pieces made

All the pieces made

There are a few pieces I still want to re-make; 39, 2 and 3 are replaced and fit much better.  The purple “heart” isn’t quite right, the color on #43 is out of place and one or two other pieces are enough “off” that I want to replace them.  Once that is done I can clean them and start applying foil.  Inevitably I’ll find a few fitment problems due to the thickness of the foil.  I try to account for that when making the pieces, but I’m guessing that across the section where the tulip bud is there will be some problems.  Hopefully the next time you see this it will be done and installed in the door.

 

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Limbert 305 1/2 CAD Renderings

I’m sorry, I can’t help it.  Having drawn out the front and rear view of the Limbert 305 1/2 cabinet the other day I really wanted to see what it might look like if I built it.

 

Limbert 305 1/2 Cabinet Detail

Limbert 305 1/2 Cabinet Detail

I decided that the proportions of the various parts in my initial drawing were close enough.  I settled on a series of 1/8″ set backs — the  edges of the top and sub-top are are in 1/8″ from the legs, the rails are set back 1/8″ from the top, the door is set in 1/8″ from the rails, etc.  In the drawing from the catalog the panels in the front and sides look to be either ship-laped or tongue-and-groove construction, so that’s how I set up the model.  I did do some of the joinery in the CAD model (for example, the mortise and tenon construction) but I didn’t model all of the joinery.  I just wanted to see what it looks like, if I decide to make it some day I’ll sort out the rest of the construction details that I glossed over.

The glass panel in the catalog drawing is hard to make out, but looking at other drawings from the catalog I think that is suppossed to be a branch with a couple of leaves.  If I make this I’d probably do some sort of Oak leaf pattern like the drawing below.  For this rendering I just used a plain piece of opalescent glass.  The mission style pull is just a quick model that I did, but it works OK, the pull in the catalog drawing is different. but hard to see enough detail to make it.  (What am I saying, I’m not actually going to build this am I?)

Possible layout for the  stained glass panel

Possible layout for the stained glass panel

So here is what I came up with.  There are a few construction details to sort out, but it should be pretty straightforward to build if someone wants to do it.  I think the slats fir the panels make it a little more interesting.  The finish needs to be darker, but getting a truly realistic wood rendering in SolidWorks is something I’m still playing with.  It takes a lot experimentation and fussing around, at least it takes that for me to do it.  This is just a standard 2D oak from the materials library.  The glass is an actual photograph of the glass applied as a “decal” to the surface with some luminescence to make it pop a little more.

Limbert 305 1/2 Rendering

Limbert 305 1/2 Rendering

 

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Limbert 305 1/2

Sometimes I think CAD should stand for “Computer Aided Distraction”, but I suspect the real flaw lies somewhere deep in my psyche.

This weekend I hope to crank on the stained glass for the door in the cabinet I’m making, but I’m already thinking ahead to the next project.  I want to make a clone of the Limbert 355 or 356 bookcase.  They are the same except one is wider by the addition of a second door, which is probably the version I’d make as we always need more storage space for books.  I think the 355 single door version is a little more elegant though.

Limbert 356 Bookcase

Limbert 356 Bookcase

Well, one thing leads to another, as it often does, and I bought a reprint of the 1903 Limbert catalog hoping to find more information on this bookcase.  Turns out it doesn’t show up until the 1904 catalog.  But…there was this interesting “cabinet” in the 1903 catalog.

I’m not sure whether it’s a table, a stand or a cabinet, but the catalog calls it a cabinet so I’ll do the same.  Here is what it says:

No. 305 1/2. Cabinet. 12″ deep, 16″ wide, 41″ high, oak, opalescent art leaded glass in upper panel of door, finished in any color.  Price, $17,00.

It struck me as an odd piece, and since the catalog only shows a simple line drawing I was curious.  I googled for extant example, but came up empty.  So I decided to model it in CAD to see what it might look like.

Limbert 305 1/2 from the 1903 catalog

Limbert 305 1/2 from the 1903 catalog

Starting from the overall dimensions I started setting the sizes for various parts by eye.  I think I’m pretty close, although line drawings like this are inherently inaccurate.  Think about building something from an Escher drawing.

Before I actually model it in 3D I need to think about material thicknesses, joinery and setbacks.

Rough dimensions for the front

Rough dimensions for the front

Rough dimensions for the side

Rough dimensions for the side

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Started the Stained Glass Panel for the Byrdcliffe-ish Cabinet

Yesterday I started on the stained glass panel for the door in the cabinet I’m making.  I was surprised (58 pieces, shocked!) when I set up the pattern for the glass at the number of pieces it’s going to be a little more work than I anticipated.  It’s also going to be kind of fussy work as some of the parts are pretty tiny, and I need to be careful to keep the main seams very straight and even or it will look “off”.

I started by making a test panel from 1/8″ MDF to make sure I had the size exactly right.  I sized the rebate in the back of the door so that about half of the zinc channel that will edge the glass will show.  In fact, if everything is exactly on the money the panel should end up being the exact size of the opening.  The zinc channel is about .550″ wide, with an internal stop for the glass that is about .330 from the outside of the channel — and I made the rebate .330 deep.

Checking the fit of the mockup for the glass panel using the zinc banding - top to bottom

Checking the fit of the mockup for the glass panel using the zinc banding – top to bottom

Checking the fit of the mockup for the glass panel - side to side.  It's a little loose and I needed to make the mock up a slosh wider.

Checking the fit of the mockup for the glass panel – side to side. It’s a little loose and I needed to make the mock up a slosh wider.

Fit from the front to check the reveal on the zinc edging

Fit from the front to check the reveal on the zinc edging

Next I set up the pattern board.  I don’t know if other glass people do it this way, but I’ve found it works really well.  What I do is glue the pattern down to a scrap of plywood.  Then I layer packing tape over it to protect it from water damage – the glass grinder is water cooled and there are often several trips back and forth to sneak up on the fit.  Then I staple a guide strip along one edge and use my MDF mockup of the glass to make sure the other three guide strips are square and perfectly sized.  As long as the foiled and tack-soldered panel fits in the opening I’m positive it will fit into the door with the zinc channel added.

Pattern board set up

Pattern board set up

Then I pressed my son into service to help cut and grind pieces.  We worked an hour or so and made a good start on it.  Next weekend we should be able to finish it (fingers crossed).  As we add more pieces and foil it I’m sure we’ll need to adjust the fit, and probably re-make a few pieces.  On this particular piece I need to have a really good fit on along all of the long straight lines, if they aren’t straight it will look sloppy.  Gaps and irregular edges on the curved parts isn’t a big deal as long as it doesn’t end up with a wonky seam.

Fitting in the background pieces

Fitting in the background pieces

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Applying Finish to the Brydcliffe-ish Cabinet

I scraped and sanded the exterior of the cabinet today.  I sanded through 220, wet the surface to raise the grain, and scuff sanded with 320 after that.  Then I started building color, starting with a water dye.

I decided I liked the sample with the Brown Mahogany dye and Candelite gel stain combination.  To try to get more contrast I diluted the dye a bit more than the concentration I used on the sample.  My rationale was that the gel stain didn’t seem to affect the color of the ray flecks much (or maybe at all).  It colors the regular straight grain, and darkens the pores of the wood, but didn’t seem to affect the ray flecks.  So, my thinking is that I’ll get a better contrast this way.  We’ll see…

I decided to hold off on installing the back until after the finish is on, so here we go.

Sanded and ready

Sanded and ready

Parts laid out on my 400hp supercharged finishing bench

Parts laid out on my 400hp supercharged finishing bench

Dye applied, wiped down and drying.  I let the dye dry for an hour, then rubbed the surfaces with a maroon scotchbrite pad to remove any raised grain, and remove a little color from the very top surface.  The color is a little weird at this point, and I’m more than a little nervous.

Dye applied

Dye applied

Dyed

Dyed

Rubbing the parts out with the scotchbrite seemed to make the ray flecks a little brighter, but it’s a subtle thing.  The 1/2″ x 1/4″ strips are to make the stops that will hold the glass, I’ll cut them to fit after I’ve done the glass insert.

Next I applied the gel stain.  Not much to that, I brushed it on in a nice thick coat and let it set for a few minutes, then wiped it off.  After wiping the gel stain off I wiped everything down with linseed oil and left it to dry overnight.  Tomorrow I’ll see how it looks.  If it needs any touch ups I’ll deal with that, otherwise I’ll apply a couple of coats of shellac and rub it out with steel wool and wax.

I like the color, I think this is going to work out OK.

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

Gel stain and a coat of linseed oil

I’m happy with the color, although I think it could be a little darker.  I may put a coat of garnet shellac on it to get a little more color tomorrow.  And I’ll wax it with brown wax, which will help too. TomorrowI should be able to finish the finish, install the back and start on the stained glass panel.

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